Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia man to face sentencing for N.Y. murder

An American mental health advocate fears a Canadian man diagnosed as a paranoid schizophrenic would receive inadequate medical treatment if he's sentenced to life in a U.S. jail for killing a New York state man. murdering a New York state man.

An American mental health advocate fears a Canadian man diagnosed as a paranoid schizophrenic would receive inadequate medical treatment if he's sentenced to life in a U.S. jail for killing a New York state man.

Glen Race of Dartmouth, N.S., was convicted last fall of killing Darcy Manor in Mooers, N.Y., in May 2007.

The prosecution alleged during the trial that Race shot Manor, 35, in the back at a secluded hunting lodge.

Race, 27, is scheduled to appear in court in Plattsburgh, N.Y., on Thursday for sentencing.

Joel Pink, the lawyer for Race's family in Nova Scotia, said he expects Race will be sentenced to life without parole in a New York penitentiary.

After sentencing, Pink said Race would be taken to a New York state reception centre for a psychiatric assessment before going to prison.

His family fears that jail will worsen his condition while his conviction is appealed, said Pink.

Bob Corliss, director of forensic services for the Mental Health Association for New York State, said mental health treatment is available in some state and federal prisons, but it is likely to be inadequate in Race's case.

"When you're in the correctional system, you're first and foremost an inmate who is there for punishment," he said in an interview.

"The access to medication is fairly good, but it doesn't go much further than that. And people with an illness like that need a good deal more therapy and interventions, and that, by and large, isn't easily available."

Appeal in the works

The advocate for the rights of the mentally ill also said it's possible that Race could eventually be sent to the Central New York Psychiatric Centre, where some severely ill inmates receive more intensive treatment.

Corliss said he was "surprised" that the defence did not pursue an insanity defence.

Andrew Wylie, the U.S. district attorney for Clinton County in New York state, said in an email in July 2007 that psychiatrists found Race competent to stand trial.

He said at the time that a court-ordered psychiatric exam showed Race understood what was happening to him.

Pink said the family is in the process of retaining a new lawyer in New York and an appeal of Race's conviction will be filed within 30 days.

He said the family is frustrated by the medical treatment Race has received.

"To the best of my knowledge, based on my conversations with the Race family, he's not received any medical treatment from the day of his arrest to the present day," said Pink.

There have been questions surrounding whether Race will consent to take medication.

Corliss said once Race is in the prison system, if psychiatrists determine he is "detached from reality," the Central New York Psychiatric Centre can act to require he be medicated. That would require a judge's order, and Race can argue against such a step, Corliss said.

Manor family hoping for life in prison

Richard Manor, the uncle of Darcy Manor, said the family is hoping and expecting that Race will be sent to prison for life.

He said they doubt arguments that Race was insane at the time of the murder.

"It don't think there is anything wrong with him mentally," said Manor. "He knew how to get from here [upper New York State] to Texas and to the Mexican border."

Race was arrested in Brownsville, Texas, several days after the murder of Manor at a hunting camp in Mooers, near the Quebec border.

Court heard that Race crossed the border into the United States following the deaths of two Halifax-area men in May 2007.

Race has been charged with first-degree murder in the death of Trevor Charles Brewster, 45, and second-degree murder in the slaying of Michael Paul Knott, 44.

Nova Scotia's public prosecution service said it plans to ask the federal Justice Department to request Race be extradited to Canada to stand trial on those charges.

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