Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia gas prices plummet by 10 cents a litre

Gas prices dropped by about 10 cents a litre across the province Wednesday, according to the Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board.

People can expect to pay a minimum of 95.3 cents per litre at the pumps in Halifax

It's been more than three years since the price of gas has dipped so low. (Blair Rhodes/CBC)

Gas prices dropped across Nova Scotia on Wednesday by about 10 cents a litre.

For regular self-serve gas in Halifax, people can expect to pay a minimum of 95.3 cents per litre at the pumps, down from the previous minimum of $1.059 per litre.

For Cape Breton, the minimum price of gas also fell to 97.3 cents a litre from $1.078.

People in Yarmouth, Shelburne, Digby, Queens County and part of the Annapolis County area can expect to pay a minimum of 96.4 cents a litre, down from the previous minimum price of $1.069.

In Lunenburg, Kings County, and part of Annapolis County, minimum prices fell by 10.6 cents a litre, from $1.065 to 95.9 cents a litre.

In Guysborough County, Pictou, Colchester County and Antigonish, minimum gas prices fell from $1.07 to 96.5 cents a litre.

And the new minimum price in Cumberland County is 96.5 cents a litre, down from $1.07.

It's been three and a half years since the price of gas has dipped this low. It hit 94.5 cents a litre on August 5, 2016. The last time it fell below a dollar per litre was June 23, 2017 when it dropped to 98.8 cents per litre.

The price of diesel went down as well, with the minimum average price across the province dropping by more than 10 cents to 92.7 

The Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board (UARB) announced on Tuesday in a news release it will be using its "interrupter" mechanism. Nova Scotia gas prices usually change first thing Friday, but the UARB can change the prices at any time if the market conditions warrant it.

The price of heating oil and gas took a dive in P.E.I. on Monday in an unscheduled price change by that province's regulatory body.

Oil prices have plummeted globally, triggered by fears the spread of COVID-19 could trigger a global recession and an oil price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia.

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With files from Paul Palmeter

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