Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia Christmas trees sold around the world

This Christmas people in Alberta, in New York and in Panama will gather around a tree grown here in the Maritimes.

Atlantic Voice brings the story behind the 1 million trees exported around the world

This Christmas people in Alberta, in New York and in Panama will gather around trees grown here in the Maritimes. 

During November, more than one million trees left Nova Scotia alone, bound for markets across North America, and into the Caribbean.

It's been that way for decades, but growers have been through some tough times as the high Canadian dollar cut into their profits. 

Those frasers are a strong tree, they hold their needles well, but they have no scent. They do no say Christmas.- Mike Keddy

Now that the loonie is down, some growers say this could be the year things turn around.

But that's not the only reason they are optimistic.

Mike Keddy owns a tree farm in New Ross, N.S. He says there's an increased demand for the province's balsams, especially from New England.

"The balsam is that traditional tree, it has that traditional smell," he said.

"Those New Englanders, you know what? Those frasers [grown in North Carolina] are a strong tree, they hold their needles well, [but] they have no scent. They do not say Christmas.

"Nothing smells like Christmas like balsam does." 

The CBC's Jennifer Henderson finds out more about the traditional industry of Christmas "treein" on Atlantic Voice

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