Nova Scotia

Northern Pulp 'disappointed' pollution project supplier pulls out

The U.S. company hired to supply and install new air pollution technology at Northern Pulp has abruptly pulled out of the $22 million project months before completing the job, CBC News has learned.

Subcontractors left to complete $22M project

The new recovery boiler and precipitator from Bergemann Power are a critical part of the mills committment to reduce pollution by reducing particulate emmissions. (CBC)

The U.S. company hired to supply and install new air pollution technology at Northern Pulp has abruptly pulled out of the $22 million project months before completing the job, CBC News has learned.

Atlanta based Clyde Bergemann Power Group was hired in a $20 million turn key contract last year, but the company pulled out last Thursday says Northern Pulp operations manager Bruce Chapman.

"They gave notice to the mill they are terminating their installation contract," says Chapman. "They have indicated they will honour their separate supply contract which covers the design and the supply of material equipment for the project....We were disappointed to receive the letter from them pulling out and I can't speculate on their reasons," Chapman told CBC News.

The new recovery boiler and precipitator from Bergemann Power are a critical part of the mill's commitment to reduce pollution by reducing particulate emissions.

Bergemann bills itself as the world's largest supplier of boiler cleaning and ash handling technologies in the world.

The pullout came just two days after Northern Pulp and its union met with Nova Scotia's minister of Natural Resources objecting to a new stringent operating permit.

Chapman says the mill met with subcontractors on Friday and the project will move forward without construction delays.

"They are working with a schedule to complete the precipitator project in May 2015 as planned."

Bergeman Power did not respond to a request for comment.

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