Nova Scotia

Former Tim Hortons in Chéticamp now serving up rental accommodations

A former Tim Hortons location in Chéticamp, N.S., that was vacant for years is being transformed into an apartment complex. The property was called an eyesore by many, including the deputy warden of Municipality of the County of Inverness.

Apartment complex will help ease local housing shortage, says municipal councillor

Former Tim Hortons in Chéticamp now serving up rental accommodations

1 year ago
1:47
A former Tim Hortons location in Chéticamp, N.S., that was vacant for years is being transformed into an apartment complex. The property was called an eyesore by many, including the deputy warden of Municipality of the County of Inverness. 1:47

A former Tim Hortons location in Chéticamp, N.S., that was vacant for years is being transformed into an apartment complex.

The property was called an eyesore by many, including the deputy warden of the Municipality of the County of Inverness, Alfred Poirier.

Poirier, who is also the municipal councillor for the area, said the apartment building is much needed.

"Before, you used to have too many homes for not enough people [in the community]," he said. "Now, we're too short on housing and have people who want to live and work here."

Alfred Poirier is the deputy warden of the Municipality of the County of Inverness. (CBC)

Poirier said the housing crisis has kept people from moving to the community, citing a nurse who worked in Chéticamp but moved because she couldn't find a home to stay in.

Gerard Lefort of Hammonds Plains Lifestyle purchased the property and Joey Poirier Construction Ltd. is fixing it up.

Work on the building included ripping the existing structure down to the bare-bones and adding a second level.

Gerard Lefort, a developer with Hammonds Plains Lifestyle, is converting the former Tim Hortons building into an apartment building. (CBC)

The building will be able to house four seniors, and the first tenants are expected to move in by October.

Lefort said one building will not fix the housing issue, but it will transform an unused space into a new community development.

"This is freeing up some, a little bit of real estate for four [people] to live in," he said. "It isn't gonna solve the problem. No, this is only only the start. But somebody had to start, so we chose to do it," Lefort said.

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