Nova Scotia

Nazi Germany coin found during CFB Greenwood home demolition

A Nova Scotia man working on a demolition job got the surprise of his life this week.

'Once I got it up to the light, I noticed it had an eagle and a swastika on it,' says James Cooper

James Cooper found this coin from Nazi Germany while doing a demolition at a residence at CFB Greenwood. (Submitted by James Cooper)

A Nova Scotia man working on a demolition job got the surprise of his life this week.

As a labourer who does building demolitions, James Cooper has discovered items on the job including old newspapers, a safe and stashes of straight razors, but finding a coin from Nazi Germany at a Canadian military base is a new one he can add to his list.

On Tuesday, the Kingston, N.S., resident was working on a demolition job at a residence at 3 Maple Ave. at CFB Greenwood. While lifting up some floorboards, he came across a coin that he initially thought was a penny. However, it was darker and smaller.

"I cleaned off this dark coin. Once I got it up to the light, I noticed it had an eagle and a swastika on it," said Cooper.

When he realized what it was, he let his colleague know.

"He didn't even believe me. He was like, 'Nah, it's just a penny. It's just a penny.' And when he saw it, he was quite excited as well," said Cooper.

According to the website coinquest.com, the coin is made of zinc and most turn black, but some retain a light gray colour. (Submitted by James Cooper)

When Cooper got home from work, he did some research and determined the coin is a 1 Reichspfennig.

The coin is not worth very much. According to the website coinquest.com, it's worth less than $10 USD. The site says the coin is made of zinc and most of them turn black, but some retain a light gray colour.

What happens to the coin now?

Cooper plans to give the coin to his girlfriend's grandfather who is an avid coin collector.

"I can almost guarantee he doesn't have one of these," said Cooper.

He's unsure of how the coin got to where it was and hopes that somebody who lived at the home might be able to explain how it got there.

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