Nova Scotia

N.S. goalie suffers severe concussion

A Nova Scotia Junior B hockey goaltender is recovering from a severe concussion after a vicious blow to the head by an opposing player during a weekend game.
Junior B goalie Tyler Whynot suffered a severe concussion Saturday night. ((Contributed))

A Nova Scotia Junior B hockey goaltender is recovering from a severe concussion after a vicious blow to the head by an opposing player during a weekend game.

Tyler Whynot, 21, was minding the net for the Windsor Royals on Saturday night when he was blindsided by the arm of a player with the St. Margarets Bay Ducks in the last minute of the game.

"A player came in off the left wing, came across, and made severe contact on his head, drove his helmet off with his elbow and glove — the whole forearm —and drove his helmet in the air and crashed him to the ice," David Keith, director of hockey operations for the Windsor Royals said Monday.

The impact knocked Whynot to the ice. He was rushed to hospital in Halifax where he underwent a brain scan to check for bleeding, and a neck X-ray, Keith said. He was released from hospital early Sunday.

Keith, who was at the game and in the dressing room after the incident, said Whynot was in rough shape.

"It was a severe attack on him. His heart rate was going up, he was very confused, he was shaking and he was not in good shape," Keith said.

"He had never experienced anything like this. He's a strong boy. This young man was the all-star at this year's Canadian national junior championship. He's a tremendous athlete. He's won provincial championships with Kings-Edgehill School."

Suffering headaches

Whynot said he's still feeling woozy.

"I still have a bit of dizziness when I stand up, and I still have a headache during the day," he said. "But, other than that, a little bit of neck stiffness."

The Saint Margarets Bay player who hit Whynot has been suspended indefinitely.

But, Keith said the coaches who sent the player onto the ice should be punished, too.

"I firmly believe that he is not the only person here. He just delivered the message," he said.

In a game report, the referee said the incident "was a result of a lack of discipline and leadership on the Bay bench." He called it a "disgrace" and a "mockery of the game of hockey."

The Windsor Royals have asked Hockey Nova Scotia to investigate the incident.

Brian Cashen, president, owner and general manager of the St. Margarets Bay Ducks, denied his coaches sent the player after Whynot.

He said he has sent a letter of apology to the Royals, and at this week's practice he will tell the rest of his players that the team will not tolerate this kind of violence.

Darren Cossar, executive director of Hockey Nova Scotia, said he doesn't believe violence in the game in the province is on the rise.

 "We have 2,000 games a weekend played here in the province and when we have one incident we tend to get focused on it," he said.

now