Nova Scotia

More seniors, fewer youth make up face of Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia posted both the highest proportion of seniors and the lowest share of youth, according to the latest numbers from Statistics Canada.

Atlantic provinces are becoming a region for the aging, says Statistics Canada

New census information released on Monday shows Nova Scotia has the highest percentage of senior citizens of all the provinces. (Ryan Remiorz/Canadian Press)

Nova Scotia posted both the highest proportion of seniors and the lowest share of youth, according to the latest numbers from Statistics Canada.

As of July 1, Statistics Canada says 166,519 Nova Scotians — approximately 17.7 per cent of the province's total population — were aged 65 and older. That's an increase from 2011, when the proportion of seniors made up 16.6 per cent of the province's population. That works out to about 153,375 individuals.

On the opposite end of the age spectrum, 134,532 Nova Scotians — approximately 14.3 per cent — are under 15 years old. That's a drop from 2011, when the province was home to 138,215 children.

Those two shares — 17.7 per cent of seniors and 14.3 per cent of youth — are currently the highest and lowest in the country, said Statistics Canada.

As of July 1, there are 940,789 people living in Nova Scotia. The median age is 43.8 years.

Nationally, about 5,379,600 Canadians — or 15.3 per cent of the country's population — are 65 years or older. Statistics Canada said this proportion has steadily increased since the beginning of the 1960s, mainly because of fertility rates persistently below the replacement level and increasing life expectancy.

Nunavut and the Northwest Territories posted the youngest populations while the Atlantic provinces have the oldest. Among the provinces, Alberta posted the lowest median age at 36 years and the smallest proportion of seniors at 11.2 per cent.

The median age of the Canadian population is 40.2 years.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.