Nova Scotia·Audio

Hear how the Mi'kmaw Native Friendship Centre in Halifax is growing

The Mi'kmaw Native Friendship Centre has diversified its services to provide help with food insecurity, homelessness, child care and employment opportunities. Listen to an interview with executive director Pam Glode-Desrochers.

Centre has expanded its services to help Indigenous people with food insecurity, housing, child care

The Mi'kmaw Native Friendship Centre is located in north-end Halifax, but it serves the thousands of Indigenous people living across Nova Scotia. (Zoe Tennant/CBC)

Pam Glode-Desrochers has been working to improve services for Indigenous people across Nova Scotia for 14 years.

She's the executive director of the Mi'kmaw Native Friendship Centre in Halifax.

Under the direction of Glode-Desrochers, the centre has diversified its services to provide help with food insecurity, homelessness, child care and employment opportunities.

Although the centre has made progress, Glode-Desrochers said there's still much to be done to ensure a better future for Indigenous people.

Pam Glode-Desrochers is the executive director of the Mi'kmaw Native Friendship Centre. (CBC )

"It's going to be worth the work. It's going to be worth the time," Glode-Desrochers told the host of CBC Radio's Mainstreet earlier this month.

Listen to Jeff Douglas's full interview with Glode-Desrochers to hear what's happening at the centre, how it has helped thousands of urban Indigenous people and what is coming next.

The Mi'kmaw Native Friendship Centre in Halifax has hugely diversified its services over the years. Hear Pam Glode-Desrochers, the executive director of the centre, talk about the programs and services that have helped thousands of urban Indigenous people. 16:03

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