Nova Scotia

Maritime storm brings more snow and flooding

Maritimers are dealing with another messy Sunday and more weather warnings.

In Halifax, some storm drains are blocked with ice and snow, which is causing localized flooding

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      Maritimers are dealing with another messy Sunday and more weather warnings.

      Rainfall warnings are still in place for many areas of Nova Scotia along the Atlantic coast. About 30 millimetres is expected to fall through the day before temperatures drop back down to well below freezing overnight.

      In Halifax, some storm drains are blocked with ice and snow, which is causing localized flooding, says Darren Natolino, the head of winter operations for the city.

      He is cautioning drivers to be careful.

      "Don't try to drive through something you know is really deep. Cars aren't meant to drive underwater," said Natolino.

      Halifax police have issued a warning to drivers about hydroplaning. Large, deep puddles were developing in some areas of the city early Sunday morning as the snow changed over to rain.

      "Slow down, be mindful of hydroplaning, keep a real watchful eye for pedestrians and vehicles," said Staff Sgt. Don Moser.

      A number of stalled cars were spotted along sections of Highway 102 into the city as drivers tried to negotiate through the standing water.

      The Halifax Stanfield International Airport is reporting delays due to the weather. 

      Dangerous driving in Saint John 

      In New Brunswick, snowfall warnings are still in place for along the Fundy coastal areas. In Saint John, the snow has changed to rain and then back over to snow making driving slippery.

      No weather warnings are posted for Prince Edward Island, but a mix of snow and rain is expected to freeze later in the afternoon as temperatures drop below zero.

      City crews in Halifax were trying to get a jump on the weather by clearing out as many storm drains as possible on Saturday before this latest round of weather. The city says there are 500 catch basins in what they labelled "hot spots" that are prone to flooding.

      Some residents took matters into their own hands.

      Charles Leverie chipped out a storm drain on Birmingham Street in Halifax to help, but he thinks the city should be doing more to keep them clear. 

      "You can't do this work with bobcats and tractors, you need the right tools, you need ice picks, shovels buckets," he said. "It takes time, if you're not going to do it properly in the beginning this is what you end up with so I think the city is really responsible for the problems."

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