Nova Scotia·Audio

Mainstreet Tech & Consequences: An in-depth look

CBC Radio’s Mainstreet has been taking stock of the anxieties people have about digital technology, including concerns about privacy and surveillance, bullying, and porn consumption.

Experts weigh in on digital privacy and surveillance, bullying, and porn consumption

CBC Radio’s Mainstreet has been taking stock of the anxieties people have about digital technology, including concerns about privacy and surveillance, bullying, and porn consumption.

Their series Tech & Consequences features perspectives on how technology has been affecting us from a wide range of experts in different fields. 

Below are highlights from several guests featured in the series including:

  • Tim Caulfield,  a University of Alberta law professor and Canada research chair in health and law policy,​
  • David Deane, a professor at the Atlantic School of Theology,
  • Dean Irvine, an English professor at Dalhousie University,
  • Stan Kutcher, Sun Life Financial chair in adolescent mental health at the IWK and Dalhousie University and
  • Christopher Parsons a post-doctoral fellow and managing director at the Citizen Lab in Toronto. 

On mobile? You can listen to the highlight reel here.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jacob Smith

Reporter

Jacob Smith has been working at CBC since he was 18 years old. He has worked on multiple live radio and television broadcasts and is now part of CBC's digital team.

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