Nova Scotia

Lifeguards warn swimmers about strong currents

Safety officials are warning swimmers to take extra precaution at some of the province's beaches because of unusually strong currents.

Lifeguards are keeping an eye on Rainbow Haven and Lawrencetown beaches

Lifeguards are keeping an eye on Rainbow Haven and Lawrencetown beaches because of strong currents (CBC)

Safety officials are warning swimmers to take extra precautions at some of the province's beaches because of unusually strong currents.

Lifeguards are keeping an eye on Rainbow Haven and Lawrencetown beaches.

As water fills and empties the Cole Harbour dykes, it creates deep trenches in the water and strong currents.

"What's happened is the channel gets more and more pronounced and entrenched and that current's become a fairly significant  challenge for the lifeguards to deal with," said Paul D'Eon, director of the Nova Scotia lifeguard service.

D'Eon is also warning swimmers about rip current.

"Waves coming in and the run back from the beach which filters into a certain area which creates a rip current," he said.

Flags are moved on a daily basis to keep swimmers in the safest areas (CBC)

 

With the large crowds on the beaches and in the water this summer, lifeguards are asking patrons to stay between the flags.

They're moved on a daily basis to keep swimmers in the safest areas.

Glenn Gray has a close eye on his grandchildren as they splash in the waves at Rainbow Haven beach.

"As a local we know about it and they warn us about so as long as you don't go too deep and far out you're going be safe," said Glenn Gray.

D'Eon says people shouldn't panic if they are stuck in a strong current.

"They'll dissipate, swim laterally out of them and the next wave will probably bring you shore."

The strong current warning is only temporary.  If a storm rolls in the currents won't be as strong.

now