Nova Scotia

Leo Glavine, close political ally and friend of Premier McNeil, leaving politics

Leo Glavine and Stephen McNeil entered political life together, each winning their Annapolis Valley seats in 2003. And both have now announced they'll be leaving provincial politics, rather than run in the next election.

Glavine and Stephen McNeil were both first elected in 2003

Health Minister Leo Glavine, seen here in 2019, says he looks forward to spending more time with his grandchildren once his long political career wraps up. (Robert Guertin/CBC)

Leo Glavine and Stephen McNeil share a political border that spans almost 45 kilometres, but it's not proximity that has cemented their political and personal friendship during the past 17 years — it's mutual loyalty and respect.

So it was no surprise that both men talked in glowing terms about the other when addressing reporters Thursday after Glavine formally announced his decision to retire before the next election.

"I've had the good fortune to come into political life with Premier McNeil," said Glavine, noting both men first took their seats at Province House in 2003. Each has been re-elected four times since.

McNeil, who announced his plans in August to retire, called Glavine a friend and described their political careers as "a great journey."

"I admire you a great deal and I wish you nothing but great health and happiness and you head into the next part, the next chapter of your life," McNeil said following a cabinet meeting.

Opposition to government

They sat near each other, first on the opposition side of the House, then on the government front benches starting in 2013 when McNeil became premier. Glavine was one of the first in the Liberal caucus to support McNeil's leadership bid against three opponents. 

McNeil picked Glavine to be his first minister of health, a post Glavine held during the Liberal government's entire first mandate. During that time, Glavine spearheaded the government's tumultuous but ultimately successful drive to merge the province's nine district health authorities into a single entity.

Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil waves after addressing supporters at his election night celebration in May 2017 in Bridgetown, N.S. (Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press)

At the same time, the McNeil government squared off against the province's public sector unions, taking away the right to strike from health workers, then forcing a reduction in the number of bargaining units in the sector. Those actions led to many large and noisy demonstrations outside Province House. The governing Liberals also imposed around-the-clock sittings at the legislature to fast-track necessary bills to enact those changes.

Glavine remained steadfast in his support for McNeil and his reorganization plans. In return, McNeil kept Glavine in the job despite the minister's inability, at times, to properly or succinctly articulate those plans.

'Everything old is new again'

McNeil's seemingly unending confidence in Glavine was demonstrated again last month when the premier reappointed him to replace Randy Delorey as health minister after Delorey resigned to run in the Liberal leadership race.

"Everything old is new again," quipped Glavine as he approached reporters after a brief ceremony Oct. 13 at Government House.

Leo Glavine was named Nova Scotia's minister of health, again, in October. (Jean Laroche/CBC)

Asking Glavine to take over the portfolio in the midst of a pandemic may have been the ultimate display of confidence in his friend.

Glavine repaid the compliment in his farewell message Thursday.

"We've had an exceptional team in Public Health, the premier to guide our province through what may be one of the most challenging and difficult periods in the 21st century," said Glavine, who characterized himself as "a very ordinary Nova Scotian" who came to Province House to "do the best work possible."

What the future holds

The one-time public school teacher called his time in politics "a joy," offering himself a rare bit of self-congratulation.

"While there were lots of challenges and stressful moments, I have not missed a day of work in my 17½ years in political office," he said.

Glavine will stay on as the MLA for Kings West until the next election is called. He said he plans to go back to private life to "enjoy what the Valley has to offer" and spend more time with his grandchildren.

 

 

 

About the Author

Jean Laroche

Reporter

Jean Laroche has been a CBC reporter for 32 years. He's been covering Nova Scotia politics since 1995 and has been at Province House longer than any sitting member.

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