Nova Scotia

Dry weather prompts water restrictions for 100,000 people in Dartmouth and area

The hot, dry weather has lowered water levels in Lake Major near Dartmouth, N.S., and forced Halifax Water to ask people in the area to voluntarily conserve water.

Halifax Water hopes voluntary restrictions will be enough to avoid mandatory ones

Low water levels at Lake Major has resulted in water conservation restrictions for 100,000 people in surrounding communities. (CBC)

The hot, dry weather has lowered water levels in Lake Major near Dartmouth, N.S., and forced Halifax Water to ask people in the area to voluntarily conserve water.

About 103,000 people in Dartmouth, Cole Harbour, Eastern Passage, North Preston and Westphal depend on the Lake Major water supply plant.

In a news release, Halifax Water is asking people and businesses in these areas to use less water until further notice by:

  • Washing only full loads of dishes and clothes.
  • Taking shorter showers.
  • Avoiding leaving taps on while brushing teeth.
  • Reducing or stopping watering the lawn and garden.
  • Reducing or stopping washing vehicles at home.
  • Fixing drips in taps.

"Very simple things," said James Campbell, speaking for Halifax Water. "It doesn't sound like much when one person's doing it, but if you have 103,000 working together to conserve that water it can make a big difference."

He said the reservoir is down about half a metre from where officials would like it to be. 

The restrictions are voluntary, but Halifax Water hopes the conservation efforts now will avert mandatory water-use restrictions later.  (Halifax Water)

The restrictions are voluntary, but Halifax Water hopes the conservation efforts now will avert mandatory restrictions later. 

"We had one in 2016, in the same area, also in 2018. Those were mandatory water-use restrictions. We're trying to get ahead of the game here this year by going the voluntary route," said Campbell.

July and August have been particularly dry, according to CBC meteorologist Ryan Snoddon.

"Had we not had such an extremely wet spring, we would be in a much more severe drought situation right now," he said.

It's been a hot, dry summer. (CBC)
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