Nova Scotia·FORECAST

Kalin Mitchell: up to 60 cm of snow could fall in parts of of N.S.

Overnight, a deepening area of low pressure moved just south of Nova Scotia and then up and just offshore of the Atlantic coastline of that province. As it moved towards Sable Island the low slowed enough to allow heavy and sustained bands of snow to sit over top of much of Lunenburg and Halifax counties.

CBC meteorologist says blowing snow a problem in many parts of the Maritimes

Snow fall amounts for parts of the Maritimes, as of 8 a.m. Hammonds Plains, N.S., has 54 centimetres. (Kalin Mitchell/CBC)

Overnight, a deepening area of low pressure moved just south of Nova Scotia and then up and just offshore of the Atlantic coastline of that province. 

As it moved towards Sable Island the low slowed enough to allow heavy and sustained bands of snow to sit over top of much of Lunenburg and Halifax counties. 

The Halifax region has been particularly hard hit by snow. Here are some snow fall amounts as of 8 a.m. (Kalin Mitchell/CBC)

The end result has been some initial snowfall estimates of 20+, 30+, 40+ and even 50+ centimetres for much of western Nova Scotia. 

While the heaviest of the snow is easing Halifax and west, areas east of Halifax (including the Eastern Shore, North Shore and Cape Breton) should expect similar snowfall amounts (30 to 60 centimetres).  

The heavier bands of snow will even wrap as far east as Moncton, N.B. and Charlottetown, P.E.I. Both of those locations could see up to 20 to 25 centimetres of snow by midnight.

The heavy snow is combining with high and gusty north and northwest winds to create extensive areas of blowing snow. 

That is going to continue to be a major issue even heading through tonight. 

Winds are going to remain northwest with gusts of 50 to 80 km/h through today, tonight, before easing to 40 to 60 km/h Thursday morning. 

Those areas that have seen a heavy, fresh snowfall (southern New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and soon much of P.E.I.) will experience off and on whiteout conditions over at least the next 12 hours. 

Even with the winds diminishing tomorrow morning they will still be strong enough to produce some blowing snow on Thursday.

Lots of shovel work ahead as even after the snow begins to ease, blowing snow will fill in driveways quickly. Make sure to take plenty of breaks, help neighbours in need, and be aware that visibility will be very poor on roads.
 

About the Author

Kalin Mitchell

Meteorologist

Kalin Mitchell is the meteorologist on CBC News Nova Scotia, CBC News New Brunswick and CBC News Atlantic Tonight. He can also be heard on various afternoon CBC Radio shows giving up-to-the-minute weather forecasts.