Nova Scotia

Jollimore condos get mixed neighbourhood reaction

A development in the Halifax neighbourhood of Jollimore has stirred up some controversy. Some neighbours support the heritage-themed condos. Others are concerned it could mean too much traffic in the quiet area.

A planned development in the Halifax neighbourhood of Jollimore has stirred up some controversy. Some neighbours support the heritage-themed condos. Others are concerned it could mean too much traffic in the quiet area.

"So there will be 12 individual home sites as part of the corporation, plus a 13th common piece of land, and all of those owners will have one twelfth of that as well," said Jennifer Corson, project manager for Marterra Development, the company behind the project.

The common land will include things like the swimming pool, the pool house, the waterfront property and a boat launch. A historian has determined that the pool house was one of the original three cottages on the waterfront and was moved in 1914 to its current location.
The pool house was one of the first three cottages on the Halifax waterfront, and was moved to its current location in 1914. (CBC)

The historic-registered property at 10 Kirk Drive currently includes three homes — a 1914 Arts and Crafts house, an adjacent 1960s main home about the same size and a gate house at the top of the property, which was built at the turn of the century.

There are nine other sites on which homes will be built; owners get some say in what they will look like, as long as they suit the area.

They will also be built energy-efficient.

The original plan was to put 14 heritage-styled homes on the property, but neighbours were concerned this was too many for the area. The developer now plans for 12.

"I am in support of the Marterra development. Obviously development was going to happen on that land, and compared to what could be done there, the Marterra proposal is far and away the best solution, in my feeling," said Judith Tulloch, who's lived in Jollimore since 1984.

Traffic concerns

Tulloch said she was surprised that the narrow width of the winding street hadn't been considered — so the added traffic is a concern.

Nick Ross lobbied for the condo reduction. He said he is pleased the development will keep the historic nature of the property, but his concern is that additional traffic would endanger pedestrians.

"The width of the streets, I seldom leave the village without moving out of the way for somebody, or having them move aside for me. So introduction of any more cars will impact that," said Ross.

There are no sidewalks except on nearby Purcell's Cove Road, but with the neighbourhood's close proximity to Sir Sandford Fleming Park, many use the road for walking.

Corson said the buildings will keep the same style as the rest of the neighbourhood, and shouldn't significantly affect traffic.

The main house sits on 3.5 acres of property in Jollimore. (CBC)
While some neighbours still have concerns, Corson said the size of the property for one dwelling — at 3.5 acres — is a lot for one family to manage.

"For those who don't want anything to change, it's a really hard estate to keep ... as the previous owners found," said Corson.

The sale of the 12 homes began Friday. Each will be about 10 per cent more expensive than in the original plan, ranging from $200,000 to $700,000.

If all of the homes sell, Corson said she'll be able to proceed with the development. If not, she'll go to plan B, which is to sell the property .

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