Nova Scotia

Joggins hosts Titanic memorial

A Titanic memorial was held Saturday in Joggins, where the Bay of Fundy community was likely one of the first to learn about the disaster as it was happening 100 years ago.

A Joggins teenager caught Titanic's SOS signals on homemade wireless radio

Leo Burke, son of Edmund Burke, stands at the site where his father received the Titanic's distress signals on his wireless radio set in Joggins, N.S. (Pam Harrison)

A Titanic memorial was held Saturday in Joggins, where the Bay of Fundy community was likely one of the first to learn about the disaster as it was happening 100 years ago.

Edmund Burke, just 19 back in 1912, created his own wireless radio set after being inspired by Guglielmo Marconi and his wireless creation.

For more information on the Titanic's centenary, check out the CBC's full schedule of coverage.

On April 14 at 11:40 p.m. it picked up a transmission from the Titanic.

There may have been only one phone in the community at the time, but residents knew minute by minute what was happening on the Titanic.

Burke placed a chalkboard outside his father's theatre on Main Street and recorded the messages from the stricken ship in real time.

Burke's son Leo, now in his 80s, attended the commemoration in Joggins Saturday, held in front of the building where the messages were received.

Burke told the crowd his father's memories as told to him.

Also at the ceremony, Grade 5 and 6 students read poems they wrote about the sinking and displayed their own models of the Titanic.

On a replica Titanic deck chair, a wreath was laid made of over 1,517 forget-me-nots — the number of lives lost in the sinking.

Also served was Waldorf pudding, the last dessert served on the night the Titanic went down.

 

 

 

 

 

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