Nova Scotia

Irving Shipbuilding to cut steel on first Arctic patrol ships

It's the first of September and Irving Shipbuilding says it's also the day the first steel will be cut on the first Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship, called Harry DeWolf.

More than 800 currently working at Halifax Shipyard with employment expected to rise to about 1,000

It's the first of September and Irving Shipbuilding says it's also the day the first steel will be cut on the first Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship, called Harry DeWolf.

An employee celebration will be held inside the Main Assembly Hall on Barrington Street to mark the official start of production on a 25-year contract to build new patrol vessels and warships for the Royal Canadian Navy.

The federal government awarded the job almost three years ago.

In January, Irving Shipbuilding and the federal government signed a deal that guaranteed building five ships with a ceiling of $2.3 billion, with the possibility of a sixth ship being built if cost targets were met.

More than 800 people are currently working at the Halifax Shipyard with employment expected to rise to about 1,000 people once the first ship is completed.

Another 600 to 800 workers will be employed on other projects, Irving has said.

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