Nova Scotia

Human rights pregnancy complaint focuses on meeting

A controversial meeting back in 2011 was dissected at a human rights hearing underway in Dartmouth.

Tammy Quilty-MacAskill says she was denied new contract because of her pregnancy

A controversial meeting back in 2011 was dissected at a human rights hearing underway in Dartmouth.

Tammy Quilty-MacAskill says she was passed over for a contract job at the Community Justice Society that year because she was pregnant.

Tuesday, her former supervisor, Jake MacIsaac, described what happened when he, Quilty-MacAskill, and the executive director of the organization sat down to talk about the issue.

Jake MacIsaac says he set up the March 2011 meeting after Tammy Quilty-MacAskill came into his office crying.

He told the hearing that Quilty-MacAskill alleged Yvonne Atwell, the executive director, said she wouldn't be getting the contract because she was going to be on maternity leave.

MacIsaac said when he approached Atwell about the comment, she called the allegation ridiculous and agreed to the meeting.

The former supervisor said during the meeting, the two women went back and forth: Atwell saying it wasn’t discrimination, Quilty-MacAskill saying it was.

MacIsaac told the hearing that Atwell said she wouldn’t post a job and then have to repost it in five months because Quilty-MacAskill wouldn’t be there.

Quilty-MacAskill pointed out that the reason she wouldn’t be there was because she was pregnant, said MacIsaac. He said Quilty-MacAskill asked if she could apply for the job.

MacIsaac testified Atwell responded by saying "You can apply for the job but you won't get it."

MacIsaac also testified that a couple of months prior to the meeting, he had warned Quilty-MacAskill about going public with her pregnancy because she was coming up for the job. He said he didn't have information from either Atwell or anyone else that it would be an issue, but he had a feeling.

Quilty-MacAskill was given a five month extension to her job that would have taken her up to her due date, but instead she resigned and filed her human rights complaint.

MacIsaac has also since left the organization. He told the hearing it was a horrible place to work.

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