Nova Scotia

High winds topple trees in Nova Scotia

A wind warning was in effect for much of Nova Scotia on Thursday as a so-called weather bomb moved across the region, knocking out power to thousands.

'Weather bomb' moved through region

High winds hit N.S.

10 years ago
0:53
A wind warning remains in effect for much of N.S. as high winds knocked out power to thousands. 0:53

A wind warning was in effect for much of Nova Scotia on Thursday as a so-called weather bomb moved across the region, knocking out power to thousands.

High winds and heavy rain pummelled many areas of the province, toppling trees, ripping the roofs off buildings and sending debris flying into streets.

At the height of the power outages, more than 31,000 homes and businesses were without electricity. The outages stretched from Shelburne to Sydney.

Halifax Harbour Bridges closed the MacKay Bridge to high-sided vehicles at one point because of the high winds.

Several streets were closed because of concerns about falling debris from buildings.

A toppled tree blocks Russell Street in north-end Halifax. (Craig Paisley/CBC)

In Dartmouth, Alderney Drive was closed to all traffic and pedestrians between Ochterloney and Portland streets because of concern about falling debris from the Queen Square building.

The Cape Breton Regional Police Service closed Charlotte Street — the main shopping and commercial street in Sydney — due to flying debris from rooftops.

CBC meteorologist Kalin Mitchell warned the winds would pick up over the morning, with gusts of 90 km/h or 100 km/h.

"Gusts to 100 km/h now at Stanfield Airport and Brier Island. Brier Island dropped from 11 to 5 degrees in one hour!" he tweeted at 10:30 a.m.

Mitchell said there were gusts of 80 km/h in Yarmouth.

Mel Lemmon, a meteorologist with Environment Canada, said the gusts are stronger than first expected.

A tractor trailer tipped on the on-ramp to Highway 125 between North Sydney and Sydney. (Glenn Carey/CBC)

"That's partly because it's a weather bomb, and partly because of the cold air that's going to push in behind it," he said.

A system is called a weather bomb when the barometric pressure at the centre of a storm plunges quickly.

The wind warning covered all counties in Nova Scotia except Digby, Annapolis and Kings.

The storm was expected to drop about 30 millimetres of rain on some areas.

With files from The Canadian Press

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