Nova Scotia

Halifax witnesses crane boom as projects break ground

Cranes are in such high demand in Halifax the newest crane to dot the Halifax skyline —now working on a major expansion on the 18-storey TD bank building on Granville Street — had to be brought in from Germany, CBC News has learned.
There are now 24 cranes dotting the Halifax skyline. (CBC)

Cranes are in such high demand in Halifax the newest crane to dot the Halifax skyline —now working on a major expansion on the 18-storey TD bank building on Granville Street —  had to be brought in from Germany, CBC News has learned.

That crane was erected Friday where it will spend the next two years adding three more storeys and 100,000 square feet to the existing TD building, shoehorned beside two other skyscrapers.

That brings the total up to 24 cranes working in the city.

This jib crane can fit into tight spaces. (CBC)

 

"Typical cranes you see have a boom arm that would go out over the site. We can't do that, we can't swing it easily here, so this lifting jib crane is designed to work in a very narrow spot. I think it's also interesting in terms of the gentleman who runs it, he's a bit like a rock star in the business because it is such a tight site," said Robert Richardson, president of Compass Commercial Realty.

The specialty crane operator is moving to Halifax for two years, but boom crane operators are also in high demand, especially at open sites.

The construction company Ellis Don said it recently brought in two more cranes to keep up with the building demand.

"If I look at the skyline, yes, for sure, a lot of condo buildings going up in [the] Clayton Park area... as well as the downtown area here," said construction supervisor Dale Verge.

As the newest crane starts construction cars and pedestrians will be rerouted around Granville Street until Monday.

For the duration of the construction project, Granville Street between Duke and George streets will be reduced to one lane.

now