Nova Scotia

Halifax Regional Police consulting about replacing headquarters, other buildings

Construction of a new facility, even if it is approved by both the police commission and regional council, could be up to six years away.

'There's a real need for us to better care and process our prisoners,' police superintendent says

The police headquarters on Gottingen Street opened in 1974. (Robert Short/CBC)

Halifax Regional Police is looking for a consultant to assess current police facilities and recommend replacements. 

Halifax now has a police headquarters on Gottingen Street and a patrol support centre in Dartmouth. Police officials want to know if just one new building should be built or if there could be a number of facilities in different locations.  

The Gottingen headquarters opened in 1974. The building is cramped and out of date, police superintendent Sean Auld says.

"There's a real need for us to better care and process our prisoners, to better process and examine our evidence and better serve the public," said Auld, who's in charge of the facility project.

Changes years away

It could be a year before the results from this new study will made public. Construction of a new facility, even if it is approved by both the police commission and regional council, could be up to six years away. 

"This is just one of a number of studies that will have to be taken," Auld said.

"It's going to be a significant amount of taxpayer money, so we want to make sure we spend it in the best way possible." 

About the Author

Pam Berman

Reporter

Pam Berman is CBC Nova Scotia's municipal affairs reporter. She's been a journalist for almost 35 years and has covered Halifax regional council since 1997. That includes four municipal elections, 19 budgets and countless meetings. Story ideas can be sent to pam.berman@cbc.ca

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