Nova Scotia

Halifax gears up for Pride Parade

The route is set, the floats are decorated and thousands will be lining the streets of Halifax for the 24th annual Pride Parade on Saturday.

The route is set, the floats are decorated and thousands will be lining the streets of Halifax for the 24th annual Pride Parade on Saturday.

Halifax hairdresser Jay Wells is entering all the employees at his salon on a float. 

Halifax hairdresser Jay Wells will be wearing a fascinator in the Pride Parade. ((CBC))
"Sticking to my fascinator theme, this is made with a pencil holder and a flip flop from the dollar store," Wells said Friday, showing off part of his costume

Wells has been busy creating costumes for the entire staff at his hair salon. The rhinestones and feathers overwhelm his workroom.

"It's on a huge 50-foot trailer and it's going to be a runway, basically. So, all of my creations will be highlighted and shown on the runway," he said.

The 21 people on the float will be performing a dance routine.

"I wanted to kinda go big, you know. When I set my mind to something, what's the saying? Go big or go home. Well, tomorrow, I won't be home," Wells said.

Pride co-chairman Ed Savage is still trying to fit in some last-minute entries.

"I think that it's a lot more floats this year than we've ever had before. Everybody seems to be excited about building a float, putting in a bigger entry," Savage said.

Another first time entry is a butterfly garden by Pride Health, a joint IWK-Capital Health service for people of all sexual orientations.

Cybelle Riebert, of Pride Health, shows off her butterfly wings for the Pride Parade. (CBC)
"I guess we had three butterfly making sessions of about two hours each. So, I think that's an amazing commitment that people made to volunteer their time," Cybelle Reiber, Pride Health co-ordinator said Friday.

Kevin Kindred, of the Nova Scotia Rainbow Action Project, a group that lobbies for equality, said Pride is a time for fun and activism. Their float will mimic an old time political rally.

"NSRAP is doing this to remind people that sexual liberation is still a really important part of the struggle for gay rights," he said.

"So all of our signs relate to that, and we hope it starts people thinking about it."

Organizers are expecting up to 75,000 people will come out to watch the parade that starts at 1:30 p.m. Saturday.

It begins on Lower Water Street, runs along Barrington Street, up Spring Garden Road and along South Park Street ending at the Garrison Grounds.

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