Nova Scotia

Halifax garbage app to be rolled out with new clear-bag policy

People living in the Halifax area will soon have access to an app to help sort recycling, check garbage collection schedules and set reminders to take out the trash.

New solid waste clear bag rules to be enforced starting August 1

Under the new policy, residential garbage will have to be placed primarily in clear bags. Single-unit homes will be allowed to place six clear bags at the curb, or five clear bags and one black privacy bag. (Brett Ruskin/CBC)

People living in the Halifax area will soon have access to an app to help sort recycling, check garbage collection schedules and set reminders to take out the trash.

The new mobile application will be rolled out in conjunction with waste collection policy changes to be enforced starting Aug. 1.

The new policy came into effect this month and an education campaign is underway called "Changes at the Curb," however city crews will not begin enforcing the new regulations until the summer.

Under the new policy, residential garbage will have to be placed primarily in clear bags. Single-unit homes will be allowed to place six clear bags at the curb, or five clear bags and one black privacy bag. (www.halifax.ca)

Under the new policy, residential garbage will have to be placed primarily in clear bags. Single-unit homes will be allowed to place six clear bags at the curb, or five clear bags and one black privacy bag.

The new waste collection policy comes after months of debate and multiple public engagement sessions.

"Halifax residents are actively engaged in solid waste sorting and proper disposal and openly embrace the concept of recycling," states a request for proposals to build and launch the city's new garbage app.

One of the app's features will "provide a waste sorting guide search tool to allow an individual to enter an item and be presented with the appropriate waste stream."

Residents will be able to view collection schedules and set automatic reminders about curbside pick up.

The app will also "have the ability to view recycling depots and landfill locations plotted on a map using common web‐based map tools," states the city's request for proposals.

One thing the app won't do, is earn its designers extra revenue.

The city's contract states the developers are not allowed to charge for the app's download, market in-app purchases or sell in-app advertising.

The tender closes April 23, with the planned launch date for the app sometime before Aug. 1.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

now