Nova Scotia

'We can't wait anymore': Halifax climate rally calls for immediate action

A climate action rally held Friday in Halifax — one of the thousands taking place around the world — called for immediate action to combat severe weather changes affecting the earth and all its species.

More than 200 attend Friday's event at Grand Parade, one of thousands held worldwide

The climate action rally in Halifax was one of thousands held around the world on Friday. (Carolyn Ray/CBC)

A climate action rally held Friday in Halifax — one of the thousands taking place around the world — called for immediate measures to combat severe weather changes affecting the earth and all its species.

More than 200 people of all ages gathered for the event in Grand Parade, kicking off a week of activities designed to draw attention to the issue.

Young people worldwide joined marches and climate strikes Friday. They were joined by labour and humanitarian groups and environmental organizations.

Halifax student Willa Fisher, 17, said young people want immediate change to combat the severe environmental effects of climate change. (Patrick Callaghan/CBC)

Willa Fisher, a Grade 12 student who lives in Halifax, summed up the anxiety felt by today's young people and their frustration at the lack of action on the part of adult leaders.

"I think that the youth are scared," she said. "The climate comes first and our futures come first."

Fear of economic change and political pushback are "little technicalities that don't matter. We just need to overcome them and we need to find a way no matter what. And we can't wait anymore," she said.

More than 200 people participated in a climate action rally Friday in Halifax, one of thousands of similar events taking place around the world. (Patrick Callaghan/CBC)

Among the events planned for Friday was a "die-in," part of national strategy to bring attention to the climate crisis message. Typically protesters lie down on the ground in a visible public space, disrupting the flow of pedestrians and daily business activity to draw attention to their cause.

Fisher said she and her friend, Julia Sampson, first got involved in the fight to stop the deterioration of the planet due to climate change about five or six months ago, posting a page on Instagram to inform others about the issue and to plan events.

"It's a national thing really," she said. "We're drawing a line because we want for everyone to care about climate change."

Tynette Deveaux, one of the organizers of the climate action rally at Grand Parade, said the event kicks off a week-long series of gatherings leading up to an international general strike Sept. 27. (Patrick Callaghan/CBC)

One of the rally's organizers, Tynette Deveaux, said she's pleased with the number of people who turned out.

"We're really pleased and there's so much more planned this week," she said following the rally.

"We'll  be holding the climate strike one week from today. I think the momentum is just going to continue to grow through the week. It's really special because it allows all to come together and see what each other is doing and to stand together. "

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With files from Carolyn Ray/CBC Nova Scotia

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