Nova Scotia

Invasive green crab harvest in Kejimkujik Seaside National Park

Kejimkujik Seaside is inviting people to go crabbing this summer.

Green crabs are an aggressive predator, ripping up all the eel grass in its territory

A green crab is seen underwater on eel grass in Little Port Joli Estuary at Kejimkujik National Park Seaside. (Oliver Woods/Parks Canada/Canadian Press)

Kejimkujik Seaside National Park is inviting people to go crabbing this summer.

The park has been battling the invasive green crab for years. An aggressive predator, to get to its prey, it rips up all the eel grass in its territory.

Eel grass is important because it provides habitat for sea creatures like soft-shell crab.

"Without that eel grass, it's almost desert-like in some places," said Chris McCarthy, a resource conservation manager with Parks Canada.

Even when the crab has destroyed the habitat, and its normal food is gone, it will shift to eating worms, and continue to thrive in the blighted area.

Parks Canada has been testing out a green crab trap that has been successful. (Parks Canada)

Parks Canada has been testing out a green crab trap that has been successful. In one night, a single trap caught 1,100 crabs.

"We've pulled two million crabs out of there in six years," McCarthy said.

Now they are inviting the public to take part in their crabbing adventure.

For about $30, you get an ATV ride to the crabbing site. Park staff will take you out in a row boat and show you how to pull crab traps.

More information, including how to register, is found here.

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