Nova Scotia

Former investor Glenn Dunbar to answer to fraud charges in October

The case of a former investment adviser, who is facing four counts of fraud for allegedly stealing hundreds of thousands of dollars from clients, is due back in court next month.

'It's about time that he paid for what he did,' says former client, who lost savings

In Dec. 2015, the Nova Scotia Securities Commission fined Dunbar $350,000 and barred him from selling securities in the province. (Submitted)

The case of a former investment adviser, who is facing four counts of fraud for allegedly stealing hundreds of thousands of dollars from clients, is due back in court next month.

A lawyer appeared on behalf of Glenn Francis Dunbar, 65, in Halifax provincial court on Monday morning.

During the court proceedings, the Crown produced a thumb drive with 10 gigabytes of data relating to the case and Dunbar's lawyer asked for time to review the material. 

The case was put over until Oct. 28.

Some of Dunbar's alleged offences date back to 2008. The most recent allegation stems from the spring of 2012. The fraud charges were laid earlier this month.

Roberta Hancock, one of Dunbar's former clients, said he stole her life savings.

"It's been a long time coming," she said. "We've had a lot of suffering and honestly it's about time that he paid for what he did."

Out-of-court settlement

John and Roberta Hancock say they are rebuilding their finances after losing almost everything. (CBC)

Hancock and her husband, CBC sportscaster John Hancock, accused Dunbar of defrauding them of more than $1 million.

The Hancocks sued Dunbar's former employer, Quadrus Investment Services, to recover their money. They reached an out-of-court settlement.

'Changed our lives forever'

Hancock said she hasn't heard a word from Dunbar, despite sitting in the same room with him and their lawyers during the discovery phase of the civil action.

"I wouldn't say he's destroyed our lives because we're very strong people and we've had a lot of support of friends and family," Hancock said.

"But he definitely changed our lives forever — and I think I would like to tell him that."

Hancock said she plans to be in court, and to follow Dunbar's case through the justice system.

Securities commission fine

In Dec. 2015, the Nova Scotia Securities Commission fined Dunbar $350,000 and barred him from selling securities in the province.

The commission found he took pension funds and cheques from at least five clients for personal gain, according to the decision.

The commission also fined Quadrus for failing to properly supervise its employee.

"We will never be able to put it behind us," Hancock said.

"But we've moved through it and got to a better place."

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Blair Rhodes

Reporter

Blair Rhodes has been a journalist for more than 35 years, the last 27 with CBC. His primary focus is on stories of crime and public safety. He can be reached at blair.rhodes@cbc.ca

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