Nova Scotia

Finance minister says no to selling alcohol in corner stores

The provincial government says it has no plans to either privatize the Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation or to allow the sale of alcohol in corner stores, rejecting an idea put forward by Progressive-Conservative Leader Jamie Baillie.
The NSLC is exercising dexter-instilled powers that allow it to get a court order to stop violations of provincial liquor laws. (CBC)

The provincial government says it has no plans to either privatize the Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation or to allow the sale of alcohol in corner stores, rejecting an idea put forward by Progressive-Conservative Leader Jamie Baillie.

The future of the Crown corporation has been questioned after its opposition to so-called U-Vint stores, where people are making and bottling their own wine and beer.

Earlier this month Baillie said it was time to consider selling beer and wine in corner stores, but Finance Minister Maureen MacDonald said she's happy with the arrangement.

"Our government has no plan whatsoever to privatize the liquor corporation. Secondly, I'm not aware that access to alcohol is a problem in Nova Scotia. We have many, many retail operations off the Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation attached to various grocery chains and that seems to be working quite well," she said.

The Halifax MLA said there are also agency stores in parts of the province where there are longer distances between NSLC outlets.

There are 106 liquor stores across the province, with total sales of more than half a billion dollars per year.

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