Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia RCMP investigating after girl eats THC-infused chocolate

The RCMP is investigating after a four-year-old Eskasoni, N.S., girl ate chocolate containing THC, the second such incident on the First Nation in recent days.

Police say incident unrelated to THC-laced cake served last week at Eskasoni, N.S., school

Police said the four-year-old girl who ate the chocolate was taken to hospital. (Robert Short/CBC)

The RCMP is investigating after a four-year-old Eskasoni, N.S., girl ate chocolate containing THC, the second such incident on the First Nation in recent days.

Eskasoni RCMP were called to a private residence in the community at 9:18 p.m. Tuesday after the girl consumed the chocolate. THC is the active ingredient in cannabis.

"The child was in obvious need of medical attention," said Cpl. Lisa Croteau, a spokesperson for the RCMP.

The child was taken to hospital for treatment. Croteau couldn't say whether or not the girl was still in hospital and did not have a status update on her.

It's unclear whether or not the chocolate was purchased from a commercial business or made at home.

Molasses cake

This is the second such incident in Eskasoni First Nation in the last several days. Several children and adults became sick after eating molasses cake containing THC at an immersion school event Jan. 31.

Croteau said the two incidents are unrelated. The investigation is ongoing.

The IWK Regional Poison Centre in Halifax said this week it has seen a significant increase in calls related to cannabis edibles in recent years, and expects more with the recent legalization of the products.

The best advice for people making edibles at home is to take strong precautions to protect others, according to Dr. Nancy Murphy, the poison centre's medical director, including labelling and locking them up.