New Brunswick

Energy East Pipeline protest draws hundreds

Hundreds of people from across New Brunswick marched through Red Head Saturday as they spoke out against a proposed pipeline that would end near the community.

$12 billion project expected to be completed in 2020

Hundreds of people came from all over the province to speak out against the proposed pipeline. (Matthew Bingley/CBC)

Hundreds of people from across New Brunswick marched through Red Head Saturday as they spoke out against a proposed pipeline that would end near the community.

TransCanada Corp.'s Energy East Pipeline would transport oilsands crude oil from Alberta to export terminals in Quebec and New Brunswick. 

Saturday's crowd spanned over 2.5 kms, said the CBC's Matthew Bingley.

People carried banners with the names of the bodies of water that they want to protect from the pipeline. They worry it will pollute their drinking water.

"Many people are concerned about the proposed oil tank farm that would go in the area which they think will ruin their quality of living," said Bingley.

First Nations leaders lit a sacred fire after the walk.

An Energy East spokesperson says while there may be some opposition to the $12 billion project, many others are in favour. It's expected to bring 2,300 direct and indirect jobs to the province over the span of the project.

TransCanada hopes to have the first oil deliveries arrive in New Brunswick in 2020.

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