Environics poll suggests Conservatives trail in key Nova Scotia ridings

A new poll conducted by Environics Research suggests the Conservative candidates, in two former Conservative ridings in Nova Scotia, may be facing defeat.

About 600 people were polled by telephone last weekend

In Central Nova, the riding cabinet minister Peter MacKay has represented for 18 years, the Liberal candidate is preferred by 50 per cent of those polled. (Canadian Press)

A new poll conducted by Environics Research suggests the Conservative candidates, in two former Conservative ridings in Nova Scotia, may be facing defeat.

In both ridings, the Liberal candidates are polling well ahead of their rivals.

In Central Nova — the riding held by former cabinet minister Peter MacKay for 18 years — Liberal Sean Fraser is preferred by 50 per cent of those polled, while Conservative Fred Delorey has 23 per cent support and New Democrat Ross Landry trails with 20 per cent.

In Cumberland-Colchester, the survey shows Liberal Bill Casey with the support of 54 per cent of people polled, while Conservative Scott Armstrong, who has represented the riding for the Conservatives since 2009, has the support of 32 per cent. 

The New Democrat in the race Wendy Robinson, garnered seven per cent support.

The poll was conducted on behalf of Leadnow, an advocacy group which has no formal political affiliation, but is working to find ways to defeat Stephen Harper's Conservative government.

Environics conducted automated telephone surveys in both ridings last weekend. In each case about 600 people were polled resulting in a margin of error of plus or minus four per cent 19 times out of 20.

The Nova Scotia ridings were among 31 ridings selected by Leadnow because it considers them "battleground ridings."

They are ridings the group believes can be won by other than a Conservative "if people vote together for change."

About the Author

Jean Laroche

Reporter

Jean Laroche has been a CBC reporter for 32 years. He's been covering Nova Scotia politics since 1995 and has been at Province House longer than any sitting member.

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