Nova Scotia

Diane Finley confirms Irving shipbuilding contract

The federal minister of public works, Diane Finley, and senior regional minister Peter MacKay confirmed Friday that Irving Shipbuilding Inc. of Halifax will be the prime contractor on the planned replacement for the navy's frigates.
Workers look on from the bow of a ship as Prime Minister Stephen Harper addresses the crowd at the Halifax Shipyard in Halifax on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2012. The federal government and Irving Shipbuilding Inc. have reached an agreement in principle to build the navy's next fleet of warships. (Andrew Vaughan/Canadian Press)

The federal government confirmed Friday that Irving Shipbuilding Inc. of Halifax will be the prime contractor on the planned replacement for the navy's frigates.

Two days ago, defence and government sources told The Canadian Press that the company would be the lead firm in the program.

Irving Shipbuilding, under the name Saint John Shipbuilding, was the lead contractor on the construction of the existing frigates in the late 1980s and throughout the 1990s.

Federal officials also formally announced that Irving Shipbuilding has been awarded a $2.3-billion build contract for six Arctic Patrol vessels.

Officials from Public Works and National Defence confirmed the contract last week during a briefing in Ottawa with Irving Shipbuilding president Kevin McCoy.

The announcement Friday marks the start of the construction phrase under the federal shipbuilding procurement strategy.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversationCreate account

Already have an account?

now