Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia boxer Custio Clayton ready for biggest pro fight of career

Nova Scotia boxer Custio Clayton says his fight this weekend in Montreal is the biggest of his professional career. The 29-year-old will step into the ring to trade punches with Oscar Cortez of Mexico.

'I can become top 10 or top 15 in the world and then I could get a world title shot'

Nova Scotia boxer Custio Clayton is fighting for the WBC Continental Americas welterweight title this weekend in Montreal. (Ng Han Guan/Canadian Press.)

Nova Scotia boxer Custio Clayton says his fight this weekend in Montreal is the biggest of his professional career.

The 29-year-old welterweight will step into the ring Saturday to trade punches with Oscar Cortez of Mexico. Up for grabs will be the WBC Continental Americas welterweight title and an International Boxing Federation regional title.

Clayton said a win would put him into the next level of fighters in a very tough weight division.

"I can become top 10 or top 15 in the world and then I could get a world title shot at any minute," he said.

'Ready to take it to the next level'

Raised in North Preston, Clayton learned how to box at a boxing club in Dartmouth operated by his uncle.

The father of four has won all 11 of his pro fights and now boxes out of Montreal where he's in the final months of a three-year contract with Groupe Yvon Michel.

Custio Clayton, right, is shown after losing a controversial decision at 2012 Olympics in London. (Murad Sezer/Reuters)

"The progression has been very good," said Clayton. "I've really learned a lot and I'm ready to take it to the next level. I'm very happy with my promoter here in Montreal."

Clayton was a six-time Canadian amateur champion and fought for Canada at the 2012 Olympics in London. He won his first two fights but then lost a controversial decision to a British fighter, a defeat that denied him the chance to fight for a medal. He said he doesn't think about that fight much anymore and is now focused on continuing to improve as a pro.

No boxing opportunities in Halifax

Clayton said moving to Montreal was necessary because professional boxing has vanished from Halifax.

"You follow your dreams and try to reach your goal," he said. "No matter who you are or where you come from, it's possible."

Clayton said he's always been careful to stay out of trouble and remain focused on finding success in the ring. In early April Clayton, who is black, said he was racially profiled by Montreal police. He said he was detained without reason, handcuffed and arrested on suspicion of being a drug dealer. He was later released.

He's asked for a public apology from police but has not received one.

Clayton said he's unsure if he will take any legal action regarding the matter and will make a decision after his Saturday night fight at the Bell Centre in Montreal.

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