Nova Scotia

Chester junior women's curling team heads to world championship

Skip Mary Fay and her junior women's curling team from Nova Scotia's South Shore have had an incredible year so far — and now they're eyeing a world championship.

Chester skip Mary Fay and her junior women's curling team are in Denmark this weekend

Manitoba skip Matt Dunstone, right, and Nova Scotia skip Mary Fay show off their medals. (Submitted by Michael Burns/Curling Canada)

Skip Mary Fay and her junior women's curling team from Chester have had an incredible year so far — and now they're eyeing a world championship.

The 17-year-old Nova Scotian led her rink to the Canadian Junior Women's Curling title at the end of January.

Now, Fay — along with third Kristin Clarke, second Karlee Burgess, lead Janique LeBlanc and coach Andrew Atherton — are trying to win the World Junior Curling Championship title.

The championship begins in Denmark on Saturday with the Canadian junior women's team scheduled to play Switzerland, followed by Sweden on Sunday.

"It's been a dream," Fay said. "We are trying to enjoy every moment and hold onto these memories forever."

Community members in Chester put up a sign wishing Mary Fay's team good luck. (Colleen Jones/CBC)

'This year has been unreal'

This event comes on the heels of Fay and Burgess winning gold in the mixed event of the World Youth Olympics in Norway.

"I'm kind of scared," teammate Burgress said earlier this week at a sendoff for the team at the Chester Curling Club.  

"I hope I can top this, but this year has been unreal."

The team's South Shore community posted a sign of support, as well. 

"Great job, team," the sign said. "Go get them at the worlds."

Nova Scotia skip Mary Fay (left) with team members Kristin Clarke, Karlee Burgess, lead Janique LeBlanc and coach Andrew Atherton celebrate at the Canadian Junior Curling Championship. (Submitted by Michael Burns/Curling Canada)

'We just need to focus'

A gold at the world juniors would only add to the memories, Leblanc said. The team will prepare by sticking to their routine.

"We just need to focus on the small things and take things one step at a time," she said.

That might be a cliche, but it's true, she said. That has been the secret to their success so far — and they won't be changing a thing.

Ten countries will compete at the world championship. Each will play a round robin format until the playoffs next weekend.

About the Author

World champion curler Colleen Jones has been reporting with CBC News for nearly three decades. Follow her on Twitter @cbccolleenjones.

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