Nova Scotia

Cumberland pharmacist faces suspension

The Nova Scotia College of Pharmacists is trying to suspend the owner of a small drug store in Cumberland County for several serious problems with her practice.

Investigation found Tamala Fadelle guilty of professional misconduct

The Nova Scotia College of Pharmacists is trying to suspend the owner of a small drug store in Cumberland County for several serious problems with her practice. 

A former employee complained to the college about some of Tamala Fadelle's practices.  The college investigated and found her guilty of professional misconduct.

The investigation found Fadelle had created a fictitious patient profile and was issuing pills for this non-existent patient. 

The college also found Fadelle had dispensed the powerful painkiller Endocet, the sedative Benzodiazepine and the erectile dysfunction drug Viagra without proper prescriptions.

The college wants to fine Fadelle $10,000, suspend her license for two years, and require her to work under supervision for three years after that. 

In its decision, the College wrote: "The Registrant's (Fadelle) misconduct is at the most serious end of the scale and the sanction should be commensurate.  The 6.5 proven charges are serious examples of misconduct and form part of a pattern of behaviour."

The college's hearing committee report went on to say "the Registrant's actions were in part intended to deceive the College during a period in which she was negotiating a settlement agreement for previous infractions and undergoing monitoring by the college."

This is the second time she has been disciplined by the college.  She was fined $3000 in 2009 for what the college found was unprofessional conduct.

On Thursday, the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal granted Fadelle a stay, preventing the college from imposing its discipline until her appeal is heard. 

Fadelle had also requested a publication ban to prevent any information about this case from getting out.  But the court refused to grant that ban. 

In requesting the stay, Fadelle produced affidavits from a doctor and a number of patients.  All of them claimed the sanctions against the owner of River Hebert Pharmacy would create serious hardships, because it is the only drugstore in the community. 

Closing her pharmacy could create problems

Fadelle has owned the River Hebert Pharmacy for 18 years. 

With it closed, her mostly-elderly clientele would have to drive to Springhill or Amherst to fill their prescriptions. 

Fadelle is also claiming the former employee who reported her to the college has a vendetta against her and her business.

Fadelle's appeal will be heard in October.

Fadelle is refusing to comment on the case, referring all questions to her lawyer. 

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