Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia to buy 32,000 computers to help with at-home learning

The province expects to have 24,000 computers on hand by next month, with the rest expected by the new year.

$21.5 million from Ottawa will also help upgrade school servers, Wi-Fi systems

Education Minister Zach Churchill said the new round of computer purchases means the province will be able to meet whatever needs it might face if learning shifts to at-home models. (CBC)

The Nova Scotia government is using $21.5 million in federal COVID-19 relief money to purchase thousands of new computers for students and upgrade servers and Wi-Fi systems in schools.

The news comes several days after two schools were shut down and moved to at-home learning for two weeks due to several COVID-19 cases.

Education Minister Zach Churchill said the province will buy 32,000 new computers, 24,000 of which have already been ordered and are expected to arrive by next month. The rest are to come in the new year.

This is in addition to the 14,000 devices the province has already purchased. During a virtual briefing, Churchill said the level of need was determined by surveys submitted earlier this year by students and parents, as well as local input from regional education officials. The minister said the new supply would be able to meet demand.

"This is about ensuring that there's not a digital divide in our education system, that all of our students have equitable access to the tools they need to learn and succeed, even in an at-home learning environment," he said.

The computers are coming from IMP following a tender process.

A silver lining for the department

The timing is particularly relevant because on Friday the province closed Auburn Drive High School in Cole Harbour and Graham Creighton Junior High School in Cherry Brook for 14 days after three cases of COVID-19 were detected between the two schools.

When schools were shut down last spring and learning moved to an at-home model, it caused a number of problems for families and teachers. Churchill said much has been learned from that experience and he expects things to go more smoothly this time.

N.S. education minister says province buying more computers for at-home learning

CBC News Nova Scotia

5 months ago
4:40
Minister Zach Churchill says the province is using $21.5 million in federal COVID-19 relief money to purchase thousands of new computers for students, upgrade school Wi-Fi . 4:40

Along with ensuring people who need technology have it, there are guidelines in place to help teachers and other staff and options such as teleconferences, USB drives for the sharing of work and appointments to attend schools in cases where students do not have high-speed internet at home.

If there is a silver lining to the situation, Churchill said it's that his department has been forced to consider technological capacity and assess who does and does not have access to digital learning tools sooner than perhaps was otherwise planned.

"I don't see us moving back from this. In fact, I see us enhancing our ability to utilize technology in the learning environment at school and at home for the long run," he said.

Erring on the side of caution

In announcing the school closures on Friday, Premier Stephen McNeil acknowledged that it was as much about addressing concerns parents, students and staff had about the situation as it was anything else. Churchill said Monday that officials will err on the side of caution when it comes to determining whether a school should shift to a blended learning model or full at-home learning.

"Even if the risk may be low, we want to make sure that we're responding in a way that minimizes the risk of spread to the best of our ability."

Nova Scotia's Chief Medical Officer of Health, Dr. Robert Strang, has confirmed that evidence of community spread now exists in the greater Halifax area and his office has started announcing new restrictions. 

As of Monday, there were 51 known active cases of COVID-19 in the province.

The funding announcement is in addition to the $40 million the province announced in August to help with the restart of the school year. Although the issues with technology were well established before September, Churchill said his department was awaiting access to the money from Ottawa before it could act.

It's his hope the upgrades to servers and Wi-Fi systems will be completed before the end of the school year. The funding also includes money for 10 new full-time positions to help support the new devices, infrastructure upgrades and general at-home learning needs.

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