Nova Scotia

Court won't rule if Brindi should be in foster care

A Nova Scotia Supreme Court judge says she can't rule if Brindi the dog should be removed from the kennel where she is being held by the city and placed into foster care.
Brindi the dog has now been turned over to the Halifax Regional Municipality. (YouTube)

A Nova Scotia Supreme Court judge says she can't rule if Brindi the dog should be removed from the kennel where she is being held by the city and placed into foster care.

Halifax authorities first seized Brindi four years ago after she bit another dog. She's been held in a kennel at taxpayers' expense for more than two years.

Her owner, Francesca Rogier, was convicted on several charges that she failed to control her dog. She is appealing the conviction, the fines, and the loss of her dog.

Rogier appealed to the Supreme Court to send the dog to a foster home, until the legal wrangling is over, and Brindi's final fate can be decided.

Justice Heather Robertson said the Supreme Court doesn't have that jurisdiction.

"I can't do something that is so unusual there is no precedent for it," she said.

Rogier, who is representing herself, asked about using legal precedents from family court.

The judge replied, "This is a dog, not a human being."

Rogier's appeal is scheduled for late November.

Brindi, a six-year-old shepherd mix, spent two years at a shelter before she was adopted by Rogier in 2007.

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