Nova Scotia

Councillor wants signs to help curb the noise on municipal trails

A Halifax councillor wants municipal staff to come up with some signs to shush people who use trails that run along residential neighbourhoods.

'Sometimes late at night you have users who are boisterous as they go by people's backyards'

A Halifax councillor wants the municipality to post signs on residential trails encouraging less noise, particularly at night. (Paul Poirier/CBC)

A Halifax councillor wants municipal staff to come up with some signs to shush people who use trails that run along residential neighbourhoods.

Shawn Cleary said he has had complaints for years from homeowners who live near the Chain of Lakes trail, which runs from Beechville to Fairview.

"Sometimes late at night you have users who are boisterous as they go by people's backyards," said Cleary. "I asked for signs to remind people to keep the noise down in those areas, but we didn't have any in our inventory."

Coun. Shawn Cleary said he has had complaints for years from homeowners who live near the Chain of Lakes trail, which runs from Beechville to Fairview. (Paul Poirier/CBC)

Cleary thinks other pathways and trails across the municipality have similar problems. He has decided to raise the issue at Tuesday's council meeting.

He notes that other places do have signs that indicate quiet zones along trails. "But we don't have anything that speaks to this kind of etiquette or being courteous on trails," he said.

Cleary does not believe creating the signs would be costly.

He thinks it's just a matter of coming up with a few examples and then installing them in areas where there have been complaints.

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