Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia Crown attorneys sign labour deal with province

Nova Scotia's 85 Crown attorneys have ratified a four-year labour contract with the province, giving them a three per cent raise over the life of the deal.

Prosecutors to see a three per cent raise over the life of the four-year contract

Nova Scotia Crown attorneys have ratified a four-year labour deal with the province. (Robert Short/CBC)

Nova Scotia's 85 Crown attorneys have ratified a four-year labour contract with the province, giving them a three per cent raise over the life of the deal.

The agreement between the province and the association representing the province's Crown attorneys was ratified on Saturday.

Premier Stephen McNeil's office said Tuesday the new contract is retroactive to April 2015. It gives the attorneys no wage increase in the first two years, a one per cent raise in April 2017, 1.5 per cent in 2018 and a half per cent on the last day.

It's a far cry from the wage agreement the two sides reached when they negotiated the first collective agreement between prosecutors and the province. In 2014, Crown attorneys won a 12.5 per cent salary increase that ended a five-year battle to get their first contract.

At that time, the six-year package was retroactive to 2009 and saw senior Crown prosecutors increase their top pay to $145,000 per year.

Although the association is not a union, the province agreed to negotiate what amounts to a conventional collective agreement. That contract ended March 31, 2015, and negotiations for the new deal took place over two days in September.

The premier's office said attorneys voted 82 per cent in favour of the new contract.

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