Halifax may spend $600K to prevent Upper Water Street flooding

Halifax may spend $600,000 to ensure adjacent properties are not negatively impacted by plans to raise two parts of Upper Water Street during the redevelopment of the Cogswell interchange, which could begin next year.

Raising 2 sections of Upper Water Street for Cogswell project could create issues for adjacent properties

Halifax's manager of infrastructure policy says two sections near Casino Nova Scotia (pictured) and Karlson's Wharf, which is DND property, need to be raised by a metre. (Robert Guertin/CBC)

Halifax may spend $600,000 to ensure adjacent properties are not negatively impacted by plans to raise two parts of Upper Water Street during the redevelopment of the Cogswell interchange, which could begin next year.

Paul Burgess, the city's manager of infrastructure policy, told the audit and finance committee Wednesday that two sections near Casino Nova Scotia and Karlson's Wharf, which is DND property, need to be raised by a metre.

"We've established 3.8 meters above sea level as a critical elevation," said Burgess. 

"We know these buildings [in the Cogswell district] could be here for the next 100 years so we have to plan for that."

The Cogswell interchange was built in the 1960s to accommodate a planned waterfront freeway that was never built. (The Canadian Press)

The minimum elevation above sea level was part of a recent report on climate change and flooding.

Burgess said the cost of raising parts of Upper Water Street is included in the redevelopment plans, but additional money is needed to ensure the work does not create further flooding issues on nearby properties.

"If we raise [the road] by a metre, now we have to go onto private property to regrade them so driveways work and we are not negatively affecting them," said Burgess.

The $600,000 will be needed for the 2020-2021 budget. Halifax regional council still needs to approve the proposal.

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About the Author

Pam Berman

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Pam Berman is CBC Nova Scotia's municipal affairs reporter. She's been a journalist for almost 35 years and has covered Halifax regional council since 1997. That includes four municipal elections, 19 budgets and countless meetings. Story ideas can be sent to pam.berman@cbc.ca