Nova Scotia

Cobequid Pass weather stranded some drivers for 24 hours

The provincial transportation department has announced that Highway 104 from Truro to the border between Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, an area that includes the Cobequid Pass, has reopened.

About 15 vehicles were stranded near the Cobequid Pass for more than 24 hours.

A CBC Radio listener said about 15 vehicles were stranded on a section of Nova Scotia's closed Highway 104, the Cobequid Pass, for about 24 hours. Police were checking on people, making sure they had enough gas. (Submitted)

The provincial transportation department has announced that Highway 104 from Truro to the border between Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, an area that includes the Cobequid Pass, has reopened.

About 15 vehicles were stranded near the Cobequid Pass for more than 24 hours. 

Evan Beaton said he, and a convoy of about eight or nine vehicles filled their gas tanks and left Truro, N.S. — located about one hour northeast of Halifax — at around 12:30 p.m. on Sunday.

"We got about 20 minutes north of Truro on the 104, about five kilometres south of the Cobequid Pass — the actual toll section — and it was basically down to zero visibility. We all just started pulling over with the four-ways on," he said.

Beaton said his convoy tried to help a few vehicles out of the ditch.

"By the time we got back on the road ourselves, it had blown over. You couldn't see any of the tracks in front," he said.

Eventually a plow came by but it also went into the ditch, said Beaton, and a large tow truck was called in from Truro.

"Then he ended up getting stuck."

He said he's not sure how those vehicles fared since night fell a short time later.  

"They ended up getting, I guess, the plow out and he took off back to Truro and we were basically stranded until 9 o'clock last night. Then they got another plow up, just to free up the laneway to get us into the parking area at the Cobequid Pass," he said.

Severe weather conditions

The Cobequid Pass is a 45-kilometre stretch of toll highway between Truro and the New Brunswick border infamous for its severe weather conditions. 

He said an RCMP vehicle also ended up in the ditch.

"They ended up getting a plow to take them back to Truro and they told us we weren't allowed to follow, just to sit tight. They went around to make sure everybody had enough fuel to stay warm for the night," said Beaton.

People were sharing whatever food they had in their vehicles, said Beaton.

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