Nova Scotia

Hundreds of Halifax high school students march to demand climate-change action

The protest was part of a global event taking place in more than 100 countries, inspired by School Strike for Climate Change, a movement that Swedish 16-year-old Greta Thunberg began in August.

Students from around the world have joined the global protest inspired by Swedish teen

More than 300 high school student showed up at the event. (Robert short/CBC)

Around 300 high school students marched in downtown Halifax on Friday to demand action on climate change.

The protest was part of a global event taking place in more than 100 countries, inspired by School Strike for Climate Change, a movement that Swedish 16-year-old Greta Thunberg began in August.

Five organizers from Citadel High School led a walkout to the Clock Tower on Citadel Hill, where they were met by protesters from other high schools. The march proceeded down to City Hall and Province House.

Protesters asked government for a restriction or ban on plastic, such as plastic straws, and to include young people in their efforts to solve climate-change issues.

CBC spoke to some of the protestors about why they were there:

Katie Hutten is a student at Citadel High School. (Robert Short/CBC)

Katie Hutten, Grade 12 student and co-organizer of the event 

"I was very discouraged when I first heard about what was happening to the climate and I felt there was no way to help, but when I found out about the movement started by Greta, I thought that was the only way to become part of the solution to this crisis."

Julianne Harnish and four of her students protesting at City Hall. (Robert Short/CBC)

Julianne Harnish, early childhood educator

"It's important for me because I come to work everyday and I feel scared because the children I care about so much, I don't know what's going to happen in the future for them and it makes me feel very sad."

Ivan Andreou is a student at Citadel High School. (Robert Short/CBC)

Ivan Andreou, Grade 11 student 

"I've been involved in climate action for my entire life and I'm actually a fortunate person because of that. I consider it my duty as someone who understands what's going on to come here and help out. "

Leire larranegui is from Spain and attends Citadel High School. (Robert Short/CBC)

Leire Larranegui, Grade 11 exchange student

"This is a problem happening in the whole wide world. Climate change isn't only happening in Canada or Spain, the place I come from, and I think every country in the world should fight for this. We have to do something and this is the only way teenagers can speak up."

Madelaine Hanley also attends Citadel High School. (Robert Short/CBC)

Madelaine Hanley, Grade 12 student 

"I'm here because I learned about climate change all throughout my school career and it's frustrating that something is in the curriculum and isn't being enforced by the government who write it."

About the Author

Aya Al-Hakim

Reporter

Aya Al-Hakim is a journalist with CBC Nova Scotia. She can be reached at aya.al-hakim@cbc.ca.

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