Nova Scotia

Christopher Phillips, accused in chemical scare, heads to trial in June

The man at the centre of a January chemical scare has pleaded not guilty to two charges against him and will go on trial June 1 in Supreme Court of Nova Scotia.

Phillips trial set for five days in Supreme Court of Nova Scotia

Christopher Phillips will go on trial in Supreme Court of Nova Scotia on June 1. (Facebook)

The man at the centre of a January chemical scare has pleaded not guilty to two charges against him and will go on trial June 1 in Supreme Court of Nova Scotia.

Trial dates were set Thursday morning for Christopher Phillips, after the 42-year-old waived his right to a preliminary inquiry Wednesday. The trial is set for five days.

Phillips remains in custody. He is accused of uttering threats against police and one count of possession of a dangerous weapon, the chemical osmium tetroxide.

Phillips was arrested Jan. 21 after driving from Nova Scotia to Ottawa. Police searched a cottage Phillips owned in Grand Desert, N.S., and say it was filled with chemicals in various states of degradation.

The court has previously heard that Phillips’s wife went to police with concerns about her husband’s mental health. She told police she feared her children would find his vials of osmium tetroxide.

He bragged to friends about the chemical, and once wanted to display it on the table at a child's birthday party, court was told earlier this month.

Police searched a home in Cole Harbour and discovered vials of osmium tetroxide in the garage. One was inside a PVC pipe labelled "not a bomb." Officers then searched the shed in Grand Desert.

Phillips's lawyers, Mike Taylor, has said the accusation Phillips threatened police was based on an email that was misconstrued, and his client believes he had the chemicals for legitimate reasons.

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