Nova Scotia

Chase the Ace charity draw winner hands cheque to friend

The Cape Breton man who won $136,000 at the Chase the Ace charity draw in Inverness on Saturday has handed the cheque over to his good friend who gave him the money to buy the ticket.

Dennis Jessome held up his end of a deal he had with his friend Sheila Mitchell

Dennis Jessome and the cheque for $136,000 he is giving to Sheila Mitchell. (CBC)

The Cape Breton man who won $136,000 at the Chase the Ace charity draw in Inverness on Saturday has handed the cheque over to his good friend who gave him the money to buy the ticket.

Dennis Jessome was officially listed as the winner after the draw, but Sheila Mitchell gave him money to buy Chase the Ace tickets because she couldn't travel to Inverness that day.

Mitchell says she was shocked to learn about the win.

"I haven't slept in the last couple of nights, but it's sinking in now," she said. "It's a lot of money and I always had a true friend in him anyway."

Dennis Jessome was listed as the winner after the draw on Saturday. (CBC)

After buying the tickets on Saturday, Jessome wrote Mitchell's name on the back of the ones belonging to her.

Chase the Ace is something like a 50-50 draw, but instead of winning half the value of the ticket sales, the winning ticket holder receives a smaller cut of the take and a chance to draw the ace of spades from a deck of regular playing cards to win the big prize. When the player draws a card — if it is unsuccessful — it is removed from the deck, thereby improving the odds for the next person who is drawing for the jackpot.

Jessome didn't pick the right card, but he did get 20 per cent of the ticket sales for the day, amounting to $136,344.95.

He says his good friend was excited when he delivered the news.

"She was over the top, yes," he said. "'Oh my God, Dennis. I love you, Dennis. I love you, Dennis.'"

"There's not too many man like Dennis Jessome, I can tell you that," Mitchell said. "He's been a good friend all my life, really."

Mitchell says their relationship has really stood the test of time and Jessome says in life, if you don't have honesty, you don't have trust.

"I was taught from a young boy to be honest and it worked because I had a great, great life," he said.

Mitchell said she plans to share the win with family and Jessome.

"Dennis is getting his share. We made an agreement on the money before he went down," she said. "We don't have to tell the world, but my friend will not be forgotten."

The friends say they will be back in Inverness this weekend buying more Chasing the Ace tickets for a jackpot that is now estimated to be $1 million.

Proceeds go to the Inverness Cottage Workshop charity for people with disabilities and the local legion.

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