Nova Scotia

Following resident complaints, CBRM to draft flyer bylaw

At a Cape Breton Regional Municipality general committee meeting on Tuesday afternoon, councillors approved District 2 Coun. Earlene MacMullin's motion to ask for a draft bylaw to regulate flyer distribution.

'I get complaints because they're littering,' says District 2 Coun. Earlene MacMullin

The Halifax Regional Municipality passed a bylaw in June regulating flyer delivery and it went into effect at the end of July. The companies that distribute unwanted flyers in the municipality can be fined and the new rules prohibit anyone from throwing flyers on lawns and driveways. (Anjuli Patil/CBC)

Cape Breton Regional Municipality councillors have approved a motion to ask for a draft bylaw to regulate flyer distribution.

District 2 Coun. Earlene MacMullin put forward the motion at a general committee meeting on Tuesday afternoon.

"I get complaints because they're littering. I get complaints because their snowblowers are ruined. I get complaints because they're soaked at the end of the driveway," she said.

MacMullin said the number of complaints from her constituents in North Sydney has increased because it's been a particularly bad year for rain and high wind.

"I just want to make it clear, I have nothing against flyers — I feel they should be delivered," MacMullin said. "A lot of people really appreciate them. It's more of just a better delivery system [is needed]."

It's not clear what exactly the flyer bylaw would include.

Halifax has a flyer bylaw

The Halifax Regional Municipality passed a bylaw in June regulating flyer delivery and it went into effect at the end of July.

The companies that distribute unwanted flyers in the municipality can be fined and the new rules prohibit anyone from throwing flyers on lawns and driveways.

Ian Scott, executive vice-president and chief operating officer at SaltWire Network, said in an email that the company deliver flyers to between 75 and 80 per cent of the homes in the communities they serve.

"We also respectfully maintain and follow a 'Do Not Deliver' list," Scott said.

Flyers help support local journalism, says newspaper company

Flyers are a significant revenue source for SaltWire, which publishes daily and weekly newspapers in Atlantic Canada, including the Chronicle Herald and Cape Breton Post.

"Changes to flyer distribution can put further pressure on already challenged bottom lines," Scott said. "Flyers are a source of revenue that helps support local journalism."

The issue will go before the full CBRM council at its next meeting later this month.

About the Author

Yvonne LeBlanc-Smith was born and raised in Cape Breton. She began her career in private radio in Sydney and has been with CBC as a reporter, early morning news editor and sometimes host since 1990.

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