Nova Scotia

Cargo jet that overshot Halifax airport runway dismantled

A Boeing 747 cargo jet that overshot the runway at Halifax Stanfield International Airport close to two weeks ago has been dismantled.

Repairs to damaged instrument landing system expected to take at least 10 more days

The 747 cargo jet that overshot the runway at Halifax Stanfield International Airport Nov. 7 has been dismantled. The fuselage and cockpit are gone but, as of Monday, two wings remained. (Paul Palmeter/CBC)

A Boeing 747 cargo jet that overshot the runway at Halifax Stanfield International Airport close to two weeks ago has been dismantled.

"Once all of the debris has been removed, the contaminated soil will be removed and disposed of off-site," said Theresa Rath Spicer, a spokesperson for the airport.

Flight KKE 4854 arrived in Halifax from Chicago on Nov. 7 to pick up lobster destined for China. But it overshot the runway, damaging both the plane and equipment on the runway.

The jet was to be loaded with live lobster destined for China, but it went off the runway upon landing. (Steve Lawrence/CBC)

Rath Spicer said the runway where the incident took place is likely to reopen, at least partially, on Wednesday.

While there was no damage to the runway surface, Nav Canada said there was "significant damage" to the instrument landing system localizer, which provides vertical or horizontal guidance.

"So that has to be repaired, and once it is repaired, we do what's called the flight inspection check," said Ron Singer, a spokesperson for Nav Canada. "We have a plane that will fly in to test the signals from the ground to make sure all is operational and accurate."

Singer said he's hoping the repair can be completed by the middle of next week.

Flights were delayed and cancelled at Halifax Stanfield International Airport after a cargo jet went off the runway during a landing Nov. 7. (Robert Short/CBC)

Efforts to get the runway back up and running have been a challenge, Rath Spicer said.

"We had to ensure that safety and the environment were our top priorities, so we did come up against some challenges where it just wasn't safe for them to remove the aircraft, so as an example, the high winds we had last week," she said.

Rath Spicer said the incident has resulted in three fewer cargo flights from Halifax to Asia each week, down from five flights flights to two.

She said the area with the contaminated soil is contained to where the aircraft came to rest.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Anjuli Patil

Reporter

Anjuli Patil is a reporter and occasional video journalist with CBC Nova Scotia's digital team.

With files from Paul Palmeter

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