Nova Scotia

Bus Stop Theatre closer to municipal funding for building purchase

Halifax's Bus Stop Theatre Co-operative is a step closer to securing funds to buy the space it's leasing. On Tuesday, Halifax regional council will vote on a staff recommendation to provide a one-time contribution of $250,000.

Halifax municipal staff recommending contribution of $250,000, regional council to vote Tuesday

Halifax municipal staff are recommending a one-time contribution of $250,000 to help the Bus Stop Theatre Co-operative. (Emma Davie/CBC)

Halifax's Bus Stop Theatre Co-operative is a step closer to securing funds to buy the space it's leasing.

On Tuesday, Halifax regional council will vote on a staff recommendation to provide a one-time contribution of $250,000 that would go toward the non-profit's purchase of 2203 Gottingen Street and 2268 Maitland Street.

"I'm very pleased, it's great news that city staff is recommending funding," Sebastien Labelle, executive director of the co-op said Saturday.

"Obviously, I won't feel totally relaxed about it until the vote goes through and it's fully confirmed."

The estimated cost of the project is $1.21 million, which includes building and land purchase expenses, construction and development costs, contingency and administration and fundraising support. This is down from an original estimate of nearly $6 million.

In June, the co-op got a $250,000 commitment from the municipality that hinged on the group receiving financial assistance from other levels of government.

At that time, council supported the project unanimously. LaBelle is hoping for the same outcome on Tuesday.

"I feel very positive about all this, and this will unlock other avenues for funding and financing partners," he said.

LaBelle said the co-op is an important part of the city's north end. He said there are many people who care about the future of the space.

"More than anything, it's a space, a place of gathering, a place for celebration and expression and coming together to witness talent in our community and talent from elsewhere coming to our community," he said.

"It's a place where local artists get to flourish and showcase what they've got. And it's a place that is known to be accessible and affordable to so many different people."

About the Author

Anjuli Patil

Reporter

Anjuli Patil is a reporter and occasional video journalist with CBC Nova Scotia's digital team.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

now