Nova Scotia

Massive Christmas tree destined for Boston cut down near Trenton

Nova Scotia's annual ritual of providing Boston with a Christmas tree began Wednesday near Trenton.

Public sendoff to be held in Halifax Friday; tree to make appearance in parade Saturday

The tree was cut down near Trenton, N.S., on Wednesday and will now make the 1,100-kilometre journey to Massachusetts. (Brett Ruskin/CBC)

Nova Scotia's annual ritual of giving Boston a Christmas tree began Wednesday near Trenton.

The 13.7-metre tree was cut down with a chainsaw on the property of donors Desmond Waithe and Corina Saunders.

Children from Pictou Landing First Nation and Frank H. MacDonald Elementary School performed for the crowd during the festivities.

But the event was not without its hiccups as heavy rain on Tuesday made for mucky conditions. The crane that was to hoist the tree onto a truck briefly got stuck.

An official send-off for the tree will be held in downtown Halifax on Friday. It will also make an appearance in a holiday parade in Halifax on Saturday.

The tree, which has its Twitter account, will then make the 1,100-kilometre journey to Massachusetts, where about 6,000 lights will be added to its branches.

The tree was cut as a crowd, which included children from Pictou Landing First Nation and Frank H. MacDonald Elementary School, looked on. (Brett Ruskin/CBC)

The tree is a gift meant to show the province's gratitude for the help Bostonians provided after the Halifax Explosion on Dec. 6, 1917.

The tree is a gift meant to show Nova Scotia's gratitude for the help Bostonians provided after the devastating Halifax Explosion on Dec. 6, 1917. (Brett Ruskin/CBC)

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