Nova Scotia

Bernadette Jordan only woman elected this time for Nova Scotia

A 52-year-old hospital fundraiser from West Dublin, in Lunenburg County, will soon become Nova Scotia's only female member of Parliament.

'It is humbling and it does make you start to think there is a whole lot I have to do'

Liberal Bernadette Jordan was the only woman elected in Nova Scotia Monday night. (CBC)

A 52-year-old hospital fundraiser from West Dublin, in Lunenburg County, will soon become Nova Scotia's only female member of Parliament.

Bernadette Jordan, the daughter of Scottish immigrants who came to Nova Scotia 40 years ago, was part of a Liberal sweep of the province Monday.

"I am aware of that. I have been from the start when I was the only woman candidate for the Liberal Party in Nova Scotia," Jordan said Tuesday from her campaign office in Bridgewater.

The married mother of three grown children is also the first woman ever elected from the riding of South Shore-St. Margarets. The riding had been held by Conservative Gerald Keddy, who announced his retirement before the election.

"It is humbling and it does make you start to think there is a whole lot I have to do," Jordan said.

Jordan said the wage gap between men and women, the plight of senior women and violence against women are all important issues.

Daughter of a stone mason, fish plant worker

She said she was elected, however, not because of her gender, but because of an overwhelming desire for change among the electorate.

The Liberal wave that will sweep Jordan and five other Liberal rookies to Ottawa also swept out Nova Scotia's only current female MP, New Democrat Megan Leslie.

The New Democratic Party's deputy leader faired best of all Liberal opponents in Nova Scotia, garnering 36 per cent of the vote in Halifax, compared to 54 per cent for Liberal Andy Fillmore.

Jordan paid tribute to Leslie as a worthy role model for women.

"We make up 52 per cent of the population in Canada and having one representative from Nova Scotia, well I would like to see a whole lot more," Jordan said.

She said she delayed entry into public life to look after her children — two sons aged 24 and 26, and a daughter, 22. Her husband, David Jordan, is a pension fund specialist with Manulife.

"Even though I planned to run, I wouldn't have done it when they were younger because for me, personally, my place was with them. So it would have been harder for me to go to Ottawa or put those things on hold," she said.

Jordan is the daughter of a stone mason father. Her mother worked on the line in a Riverport fish plant.

Her mother has since moved back to Scotland, but followed Canadian election results on CBC News. On Tuesday, she sent flowers to her daughter in Bridgewater.

"She's proud," said Jordan.

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