Nova Scotia

Bedford sewage dump investigated by Halifax Water

Halifax Water is investigating after someone illegally dumped raw sewage in Bedford near the new CP Allen High School.

Workers called out to a stinky mess on Innovation Drive where sewage was dumped down a storm drain

Some of the debris left behind after an illegal sewage dump on Innovation Drive in Bedford, N.S. (CBC)

Halifax Water is investigating after someone illegally dumped raw sewage in Bedford near the new CP Allen High School.

James Campbell from Halifax Water said workers were called out Wednesday to a stinky mess on Innovation Drive. A video they recorded shows someone tried to dump the sewage into a catch basin, but much of it didn’t land there.

Instead, raw sewage spread on the road and sidewalk. 

There were a number of clues in the matter that was left here.- James Campbell, Halifax Water

“It's illegal to do it wherever, but especially bad here in a storm line because it's going directly into the environment downstream,” Campbell said.

The untreated mess is an environmental and health concern.

“Unfortunately, where it’s a storm line here, it means the sewage is going directly into the local receiving water,” Campbell said. 

Halifax Water doesn't know who dumped it or how much was dumped, but the storm line empties into nearby Sandy Lake. Water crews checked and found no evidence of human waste there.

Campbell said the search is now on for those responsible.

“There were a number of clues in the the matter that was left here so we have pollution-control team that will trace that back and try to find the offender,” he said.

Michelle Hilchie-Sinclair with Hilchie Environmental Septic Service said they, like everyone else who collects human waste, are licensed. She hopes the culprits are found.

“It hurts all of us,” she said. “It hurts our integrity and it hurts the environment.”

Trucks tracked using GPS

Hilchie has been in the business of emptying septic systems for 60 years. Hilchie-Sinclair said their trucks are equipped with GPS and tracked by Halifax Water.

Michelle Hilchie-Sinclair hopes the culprits are found. (CBC)

She said they have two designated places where they can dump sewage in drains that go directly to a treatment plant. Hilchie pays a flat fee each time they dump and she said they're happy to do it.

“The environment is a main concern,” Hilchie-Sinclair said. “In Nova Scotia, to be dumping illegally is wrong.”

If Halifax Water is successful in finding the guilty party, they can issue a summary offence ticket or take those responsible to court.

now